Working with graduate students is one of the most rewarding parts of my position as a faculty member.  Graduate education deals with developing knowledge, honing the ability to use knowledge, and cultivating the ability to think critically and with creativity. As an advisor, I believe it is my role to help foster those skills in students.  Successful applicants to the Human Dimensions of Natural Resources graduate program should have a strong background and interest in social science research and natural resources.  Excellent communication, writing, and critical thinking skills are critical to graduate school and are characteristics that I seek in students.  Students who have the ability and interest to integrate the ecological characteristics of the landscape with larger political and social phenomena will be highly competitive.  An interest in interdisciplinary research is fundamental and students from backgrounds such as political science, planning, sociology, rural sociology, environmental science, natural resources, forestry, and other related fields are encouraged to apply.  Minimum requirements for admission are GRE scores of 600 on the verbal and quantitative sections, an undergraduate GPA of 3.5 or higher, and a strong personal statement and letters of reference.  That should be coupled with a clear sense of purpose regarding what you would like to pursue in graduate school.  

If you are interested in applying, the first step is to contact me and share some basic information about your interests and background.  The documents that I would like to see are:  1) a personal statement outlining your research interests and long-term goals and 2) a resume containing education, relevant courses, work experience, undergraduate GPA, and GRE scores (if taken).  Please e-mail to Dr. Shorna Allred (, 607-255-2149).  


I can provide research and outreach experiencers for interested and qualified undergraduate students or recent postgraduates.  Research assistant positions are available for undergraduates and recent postgraduates. These positions are available for work-study students, hourly wages, or for credit.  These positions are available part-time during the academic year and full-time in the summer.  If interested, please send your resume/CV and a statement of interest to Dr. Allred at  


Diversity Fellowships

Diversity Fellowships are special recruitment fellowships designed to increase the diversity of Cornell's graduate student population are available on a competitive basis to U.S. citizens or permanent residents applying for Fall 2011 admission.  Students who wish to be considered for these diversity fellowships should submit a supplemental diversity essay with their application materials. The supplemental essay should address how one or more of the following criteria apply to the student: 1) history of overcoming disadvantage; 2) first-generation college student; 3) member of a group historically underrepresented in higher education (African American, American Indian/Alaskan Native, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, Mexican American, Puerto Rican, or other Hispanic). Permanent residents whose ethnicity corresponds to these groups also meet this criterion. Ph.D. nominations will be given priority over other M.S. applications but students pursuing an M.S. degree can still apply. Since funding is limited, Ph.D. nominations should be submitted on either Jan. 31 or Feb. 28, 2011.


Graduate students for whom I currently serve as Chair or Co-Chair are below:

Ashley Dayer (PhD Student)
Dissertation Topic:  Human dimensions of bird and habitat conservation in early successional forests

M.S. Human Dimensions of Natural Resources (2006)
Colorado State University

B.A. with High Honors, Environmental Science and Public Policy (2001)
Harvard University

Christine Moskell (Ph.D. Student)
Thesis Topic:  Participatory community engagement for urban forestry in New York City

B.A. Environmental Studies (2008)
Hobart and William Smith Colleges



Sarwat Ismail (Post-Doctoral Research Fellow)

Doctor of Philosophy, Botany
University of Karachi, Karachi Pakistan



Andrew Roe (M.S. Student)
Thesis Topic:  Forestland parcelization patterns, causes, consequences, and current strategies in the Hudson River watershed

B.S. with Highest Honors, Environmental Science (2006)
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill